Feeling blue? This will make you feel better.

If you’ve been following me on Instagram, you know I’ve been painting exclusively in blue lately.

I was inspired by Lisa Congdon’s Creative Boot Camp on Creativebug, where she shows us how to paint using only one color.

Here is an example of her painting in red.

I started painting using 4 blue colors in my Sakura Koi Watercolor Set and got immediately hooked.

I didn’t have a goal of painting so many works in blue. But it’s one of my favorite colors because it’s soothing and calming. So I just kept painting in blues! (At the time of writing this article, I’ve painted in blue for 31 days straight. Wow!)

I like the challenge of using limited colors (and of course the limited timeline I set to complete a painting). Restrictions encourage creativity. The more limitations you set on your creative practice, the more creative you think!

Just think how you’d feel if you have a huge blank canvas with unlimited color palette and materials to play with, and you can paint whatever you wanted vs. someone tells you you need to draw a cat using just red and blue on a 4″x4″ piece of paper? See what I mean?

Of course, there is a danger of your practice becoming stagnant over time if you’re not intentional about working in a limited color palette.

When I feel my blue paintings are getting stale, I switch to different subject matters or add different elements. For example, I was painting still life at first, then abstract, and then more representational works.

One day, I did a lettering piece for one of my daily paintings and really enjoyed it, so I created a series of encouraging quotes in blue.

You know I love creating art with encouraging/motivational quotes! First of all, I do it because I need a positive reminder. And I know I’m not the only one who needs to hear it, so I like to share them 🙂

Art has the power to make you feel. When you see a powerful message represented in an art form, it goes directly to your heart, doesn’t it?

That’s how I feel about these paintings – somehow, these encouraging messages resonate with me on a deeper level than just hearing someone say it.

If you’re feeling blue today (pun so intended!), I hope these paintings will cheer you up! 🙂

Have a lovely day, friend!

xo Yuko

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Behind the Scenes: 30-Minute Daily Painting Challenge

I’ve been painting every day for 30 minutes since mid November of last year.

I started my daily challenge to invigorate my creative practice and keep those creative muscles strong and flexible. (You can read more about my motivation here.)

I’m on my day 114 today (!) and wanted to share my process and how I find my inspirations every day. Enjoy!

When I Paint:

I reserve my mornings to writing, whether it’s a blog article, newsletter, or marketing copies, and other admin tasks like doing the finances and researching new retail shops to reach out to for my greeting cards etc. Mornings are the best time for me to think and do work that requires focus.

So, I schedule a 30-minute chunk on my calendar to paint every day after lunch. It’s a good activity to transition from the admin work, and by the time lunch rolls around, I’m a bit out of focus anyway, so it helps to get my hands and the creative part of my brain working then.

If I know I’ll be out of the office or otherwise busy during my usual painting time (like I’ve been taking a pottery class on Tuesday morning – early afternoon), I’ll go ahead and work on my painting in the morning before I get out of the door. I’d rather finish the painting earlier than later. You never know what’s gonna happen while you’re out or how long your other tasks would take, and I don’t want to be thinking about “oh I still need to do my painting today” all day. Sometimes it means I have to get up 30 minutes early to make sure I have enough time to create my painting.

Having the 30-minute restriction is both great and hard. It’s great because it forces me to rely on my intuition more than my mind. And it helps me to not be super perfectionist about it – it’s all about completing a piece in 30-minutes than making something that’s “perfect.” I just heard Elizabeth Gilbert say in this show (<– you MUST watch or listen to this by the way!) “Done is better than good.” Ain’t that the truth??

The time restriction also makes it less stressful because there is always so much stuff to do, and setting aside 30 minutes a day doesn’t feel so overwhelming.

On the other hand, it’s hard because I have to stop even if I don’t feel the work is “perfect” when my timer goes off. It gave me a great anxiety at first because I really didn’t know how much I could get done in 30 minutes. What if it looks terrible!?

But as I do this longer, I’ve been learning to gauge the time better and know what to focus on. For example, I try to prioritize getting the overall composition, colors, and shapes right than worrying about the tiny details. I’ve also gotten better at painting loosely and quickly.

What to Paint:

You might remember I did a similar 365 day challenge back in 2014-2015 called “Happiness is,” where I created a drawing about happiness every day.

Happiness is practicing gratitude every day.

But this time I don’t have a particular theme – it can be something personal, like how I’m feeling or what I did that day. I get inspired by nature and food often, so things I saw on my walk or food I ate could show up in my art.

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Florals are a natural go-to, and I never get tired of painting them! I enjoy painting stylized flowers and plants from imagination more than painting from references.

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Some days I go from one subject to another totally unrelated subject , and sometimes I keep painting the same or similar things for several days. For example, I painted a series of dogs in sweaters for a while ❤

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For the months of January, I followed along August Wren’s 30-day painting challenge on Creativebug. It was fun to learn from her creative process and painting techqniques, and I found some of the prompts challenging just because I’d never thought about painting them! It’s good to stretch and go out of your comfort zone like that! I love her loose painting style and her gentle teaching style too.

Many of the paintings here are from Jennifer's painting challenge!
Many of the paintings here are from Jennifer’s painting challenge!

In February, I watched another Creativebug class by Lisa Congdon and her Creative Boot Camp was awesome! I particularly enjoyed her monochromatic painting technique using only one color and tried painting using just blue. I was immediately hooked by this particular technique and kept painting in blues for many days!

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And when I got a little tired of painting still life, I started painting abstract works in blue.

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I had also created a random list of subjects to paint for when I don’t have an inspiration. I cut up tiny pieces of paper and just wrote down random things I might draw, like hats and pickles. And when I ran out of ideas for my list, I asked my husband, Dave, to pitch in. He’s a creative thinker and gave me so many random ideas I would’ve never thought of myself! Some of his suggestions were “lederhosen” and “avocado sandwich ” 😀 And then I put the pieces of the paper in a bag, and on days I have no idea what to draw or just  want to switch gears, I can pull out a topic and paint!

Materials I use:

For paints, I use Sakura Koi watercolor field sketch kit even if I’m at home – it’s so easy to set up – you just open up the palette and everything is there!

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I used them in combination with random assortment of other watercolor and gouache paints (mostly by Winsor and Newton), some were given by friends and some I bought along the way. I just use the palette that comes with the Koi watercolor set to mix the colors (I often mix watercolor and gouache together). My palette tends to stay pretty messy… 😀 and when I need a new fresh surface, I just wipe the area clean with wet paper towel.

As far as papers go, I use the Strathmore paper mixed media pad series 400 in size 11″x14″. They’re thick smooth paper with just enough texture. I started using them last summer and immediately fell in love! They’re not the cheapest paper, but I just like how nice it feels to paint on them, and colors show so brilliantly. I cut the paper in quater so that makes each paper 5.5″x7″, which is pretty small, and I find that size just right for my 30-minute painting (not to mention stretching your  $$!)

At first I was painting on a slightly larger paper and quickly realized it was hard to fill the page in 30 minutes! And I was feeling more nervous about not filling the page than focusing on what I was actually painting, so I switched to the smaller paper, and that’s working pretty well for me.

I use a few different watercolor brushes  – #1 for a finer detail, #4 for detail and small to medium-ish area and #7 for more thicker line or a larger area (I believe I got them at Blick.) I was using the waterbrush pen that came with the Sakura Koi set and still do when I do a quick sketch on the couch, but I like having the different sized brushes and the natural  brush materials paint really nicely. I also use the wider flat brush if I’m painting the background or a larger area. It’s so much quicker!!

I also started using a hair dryer a few weeks ago to shorten the drying time, and it totally changed my life!!! 😀 It’s especially helpful when I want to layer with wet watercolor and don’t want them to bleed. It saves me SO MUCH TIME and allows me to work in more details in just 30 minutes. I don’t think I can paint without it ever again… 😀


I hope you enjoyed learning my creative process! And if you want to purchase any of my small original paintings, go back to my last post and learn all about it 🙂

Have a creative day!

xo Yuko

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New Original Paintings for Sale Every Day on Instagram!

Hi there, friend!

Are you on Instagram?

I’ve been posting photos of my 30-minute paintings every day since November and recently decided to make all of my original paintings available for sale!

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They’re small (5.5″ x 7″) watercolor and gouache (an opaque watercolor) paintings on heavy mixed media paper. I paint a wide variety of subjects from florals to my recent obsession, dogs in sweaters 🙂

Also, there is this series of still life paintings in blue ❤

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These small original paintings are available for only $69 each, including FREE US shipping (+ $10 international shipping).

You can follow these simple steps to view and purchase my paintings:

1. Search for the hashtag #yukosdailypainting on Instagram.

2. Send me a direct message on Instagram and let me know which piece(s) you’re interested in, and I’ll give you the details. First person to claim the painting gets it!

I’m adding new artwork for you to enjoy and purchase every day on my feedFollow along and don’t miss this opportunity to get your favorite Yuko Miki originals 🙂

Let me know if you have any questions! Have an awesome day ❤

xo Yuko

p.s. I’m sharing my behind the scenes creative process next week. Don’t miss it!

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New video tutorials to inspire you!

I’ve made a few new drawing tutorial videos for Sakura of America this fall and winter.

(You can see my older tutorial videos in this blog post.)

They’re all pretty short and easy to follow. I’ve been hearing from the fans that it’s relaxing, too 🙂

I’ve gathered them all up for you here. Hope they inspire you to create something new today!

1. Let’s Draw Cats 

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to draw black and white portraits of your cats using Pigma Brush Pens.

 

2. How to Illusrate Tea Pots & Tea Cups

This quick tutorial shows you how to draw vintage inspired teapots and teacups using Sakura Koi brush pens and Souffle pens.

 

3. How to Draw Colorful Roosters

I created this fun tutorial to celebrate the Lunar New Year, the Year of the Rooster! Learn how to draw these colorful creatures with Sakura Koi brush pens, Micron pens, and a Gellyroll pen!

Don’t forget to tag me (@honeyberrystudios) if you share your drawings on Instagram. I’d love to see what you created!

Enjoy 🙂

xo Yuko

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The Best Strategy to Avoid Burnout

I was on my mini sabbatical during the week of 2/6. 

It was super relaxing, and I felt like it was one of the best sabbaticals I’d ever been on! What made it so successful was I didn’t schedule whole a lot of social engagements during my week off. 

In the past, I’d  cram in as many lunches and coffee dates as possible during my sabbatical (I mean, like 3 or 4 during the week :D) because I didn’t see my friends any other time. But this year I’m switching gears and trying to spread out my social engagements more evenly and make time to see my friends in small doses outside of my sabbaticals.

I’m an introvert, and being around people, while it can be a lot of fun, drains my energy. So, in order for me to really recharge my energy reserve during my sabbaticals, I decided not to schedule any get togethers with friends in advance, and it was super helpful! I still saw people, but it was more spontaneous (imagine that!!) and based on how I felt then.

Anyway, while on sabbaticals, I try to do things I normally don’t have the time to do. And here are some highlights!

1. I did my goal setting and planning for 2017. 

I got this downloadable  “2017 Goal and Intention Kit” from Jessica Swift and LOVE it! I did some intention setting earlier this year but finally dug into the actual goal setting during my sabbatical. It felt so good to have more clear directions for the year!

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My business goal is to grow my wholesale side of business, partnering with more retail shops to carry my greeting cards! (BTW, If you know cute gift/stationery shops that may be a good fit for my work – do tell me in the comment! Both in and outside of US.)

But more generally, my goal is to be more focused – working on just one thing at a time, be more present with work and relationships, and getting more quality work done in a shorter time. I’m excited about this goal and will share more in another blog post!

2. I created abstract acrylic paintings.

One of my intentions for this year is to try and explore different creative outlets. I feel it’s important for artists to stay curious and try something new! You might end up not liking something but will never know unless you try it, right?

I’ve been a little intimidated by painting with acrylics (I took a class once and found the medium hard to work with!) but I love the look of acrylic paintings, so I watched a couple of classes on Creativebug (I especially enjoyed this one and this one) and went for it!

 

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I decided to paint some abstract pieces – just something different and intuitive .

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I worked on 4 canvases at a time since they’re pretty small (8″x10″), and I didn’t want to wait around while the paint was drying.

I shared this process video on Instagram and thought you might like it, too! It’s good to document the process to see what steps I took to create an artwork and reflect on what I might do differently next time.

 

The hardest part of creating these paintings for me was to know when to stop. I felt like I over did the first paintings – I kept wanting to layer more and more hoping to make them look like something else… I’m letting them hang out for a while to see how I feel about them later.

And the second set, I went really simple just to see how I felt about them. I still did multiple layers but used just two colors and simple shapes. As my wise friend said, it takes guts to create something so simple! You keep thinking “this can’t possible be done…?” even though in your gut you know you should stop.

And the wonderful thing about acrylic paintings is you can totally paint over it if you don’t like something 😀

3. I made waxed fabrics to replace plastic wraps.

A small part of me dies whenever I use single-use plastic wraps, and I’ve been meaning to do a DIY project to replace them.

I found this tutorial on how to create waxed linen and made my own!

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It was pretty easy, and they’re definitely prettier than any plastic wraps 😀 I can’t wait to use them and see how they do!


Taking a regular time off every 7 weeks has been so valuable to me. I’ve been taking mini sabbaticals since October 2015 and can’t imagine not doing it!

It gives me the chance to step back and reflect on how things are going. I often ask myself; How am I doing with my goals? How am I feeling about my business? Do I need to course correct or keep doing what I’m doing? And since I don’t have a deadline or pressing work issues to attend to during my sabbaticals, I can really focus on the big picture.

Focusing on the big picture often reenergizes me and gives me inspirations for the future. And, since I’m forcing myself to get done 7-week worth of work in 6 weeks, I feel more productive when I’m “on,” too!

I used to have major FOMO about taking a time off from work but have learned over time nothing went terribly wrong while I was taking a break.

The truth is, one week is not that long.

As long as you plan ahead (which is easy to do since the sabbaticals come every 7 weeks), you can totally have a regular time off without losing money or feeling guilty.

If you’re curious, I want you to try it and see how you feel!

xo Yuko

Yuko Miki Honeyberry Studios Headshot

 

 

Do You Love Succulents?

Tell me what’s on your device’s wallpaper right now.

Do you have one of those generic landscapes that came with your device? Your holiday family photo? A chihuahua standing on cheeseburgers?

Chances are, you’ve had it for a while and maybe you’re ready to switch it up with something new and shiny.

I don’t know about you, but I like to look at a wallpaper that makes me happy and inspired.

That’s why I designed these succulent wallpapers exclusively for my newsletter subscribers!

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One for your computer
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And one for your smartphone!

I created a repeat pattern from my watercolor succulent paintings, and the blue/teal color combo is relaxing and soothing for your eyes ❤

If you’re already subscribed my weekly-ish newsletter, THANK YOU, and you should’ve received your free gift a few weeks ago. (If for some reason you didn’t receive it, just let me know at yuko(at)honeyberrystudios(dot)com and I’ll send it to you!)

Didn’t know I had a newsletter? You can sign up today, and your new digital wallpapers will be sent directly to your inbox 🙂

I love mine, and many of my subscribers are loving theirs, too! So, join the club 🙂

xo Yuko

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Will you be my Valentine?

Happy February! Hope you’re having a great start of the new year so far 🙂

This year, I’m continuing to focus on making products (greeting cards, art prints, and calendars), and I look forward to sharing  more behind the scenes look and new releases with you 🙂

Since Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, I wanted to show you some of the love cards I’ve got in my shop today!

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Ta da! Cute, yes??

I’m particularly happy with this I Love You More Thanbrush lettering card I created recently!

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This design was born out of a doodle I made in my sketchbook one day. I was simply asking my fans on Instagram what they would say to their significant other if they were to tell them “I love you more than ____.”

I got a great response on that post and actually really liked the doodle lettering for it, so I turned it into a new greeting card design 🙂

(BTW, I gave it to my husband on our 10-year meeting anniversary a couple of weeks ago, and I said “I love you more than sweet potato fries!” :D)

When I design my greeting cards, I ask myself these two important questions:

1. Is this me? 

I want to make sure my art reflects my style and voice – simple, whimsical, and has the childlike charm. Sometimes I draw something photorealistic (most likely by accident!) and it feels so unfitting to everything else I do, so I typically don’t share them even if they look good!

2. Does this have a happy vibe?

I want to make you happy with my art. Period. So I keep my imagery light and joyful. I might make dark and sad art as a personal exploration, but they don’t typically become my products.

Do you like my sweet love greeting cards? Explore your options in my shop today!

p.s. I ship pretty quickly (usually within 1-2 days), so you still got time before the Valentine’s Day 🙂

Talk soon,

xo Yuko

Yuko Miki Honeyberry Studios Headshot

How do you make social justice part of your creative work?

Hi friend!

I wrote the following article on art and social justice for my newsletter a couple of weeks ago for Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday. I got a lot of positive feedback from my subscribers and thought you might enjoy it!

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The other day, I was enjoying a lovely lunch with my lovely friend, Deann, at one of our favorite Vietnamese restaurants, Tamarind Tree, in Seattle’s International District.

Deann had the crispy Vietnamese crepe, and I ordered their lemongrass grilled tofu. We were catching up on our lives sipping our teas, talking, and listening. It was a late lunch, so the restaurant wasn’t super crowded or noisy.

And then she asked me how I make social justice part of my art practice. 

I paused – because #1, I got a tiny pepper flake stuck on my throat and had to cough for like 2 full minutes, and #2 it’s kind of a big question!

Before I became a full-time artist in 2015, I’d worked for an anti-violence social service organization for almost 15 years. Social justice was on my mind all. the. time.

In a way, I didn’t even have to explain what I did to make the world a better place. I’d tell people where I worked, and they’d automatically give me the concerned look and assume I was this selfless angelic person who was fighting evil day in and day out. (Which is partly true, but I also did other things like managing employees’ insurance :D)

Social justice is still very important to me, but without engaging in a tangible direct action every day, it was hard for me to explain how it was part of my creative work.

So after thinking about her question for a few minutes, I described my perspectives on how my value is incorporated in my daily work.

I believe art has the power to unite people no matter where they stand on various political or social issues. 

You see a beautiful painting, and your heart aches. Your favorite song about lost love comes on the radio, and you feel a lump in your throat. You read a sci-fi dystopian novel and feel physically ill from the awful things the heroine has to go through.

Art makes you feel. It reminds you that you are human. It can undermine the culture of division.

So that’s how I see my role as an artist in the social justice movement today: I create art to make you feel joy and happiness. I work hard to fill our world with more love, peace, and compassion. Through my art, I want to keep reminding you humanity is not doomed.

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I’m curious how you would answer this question. How do you make social justice part of your everyday? If you haven’t had a chance to reflect on this recently or ever, give it a try 🙂

Have a peaceful day, my friend.

xo Yuko

Yuko Miki Honeyberry Studios Headshot

Creating fun patterns with my daily paintings

I’ve been making 30-minute paintings every day since mid-November of last year.

(You can learn more about it here.)

Having a daily painting practice has been great after not making art consistently for a while. I look forward to my time to paint every day, and it’s definitely strengthening my creative muscle!

One day I was picturing a serene wintery forest scene and painted trees in a simple blue/green/pink-ish color palette.

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This painting put me in a Christmasy mood, and I liked it a lot, so I kept painting similar images for the next few days.

Sometimes it’s hard to come up with subjects to paint, so when I get an inspiration, I like to explore and play with it over and over. 

After I finised 4 of these little forest paintings, I made a tile and really liked the effects. They created a fun pattern together even though it was not my intention to create a pattern at first.

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I enjoyed creating a bigger piece by combining 4 small paintings, so I worked on 2 more similar patterns with pomegranates and oranges.

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Fun pomegranates!
Did Santa bring you oranges for Christmas??
Did Santa bring you oranges for Christmas??

For these two patterns, I did intend to create a tile with the 4 paintings, so that’s why they match up pretty well.

When I first started my 30-minute painting challenge, I quickly discovered 30 minutes go by very fast!

I get a little overwhelmed when I work on a bigger piece anyway, so I enjoyed creating smaller, manageable paintings and then putting them together to create a larger piece. It also encouraged me to stretch my imagination further when painting the same subject with a fresh perspective each day.

I’m sure I’ll be working on these tiled patterns more in the future! After all, I need to come up with so many things to paint to keep my daily challenge going, and when I work on these tiles, I don’t have to think of new things to paint every single day 😀

If you have any suggestions on what I should paint, let me know in the comments! I’m always looking for different ideas.

Happy creating 🙂

xo Yuko

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Art Foam Stamp Making Project!

I’ve been teaching block printing workshops in Seattle since last spring.

I love teaching the class and get so inspired by all the beautiful student work!! Here is a fun picture from my last workshop… 🙂

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I’ve been thinking about offering a workshop that’s similar but a little more accessible.

Though block printing tools and materials I use for the class are super easy to handle (no linocut or wood block because they’re tough for beginners), I think some students are still intimidated by the idea of carving a block.

So I picked up this gorgeous book by Andrea Lauren recently to learn about stamp making using art foam sheet, which requires no carving.

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First of all, this books is beautiful! Her work is amazing and often very intricate – but she shares step-by-step instructions on how to create your own stamps and blocks in a very user-friendly way.

I became interested in the art foam stamp making because it requires no carving and is great for beginners or those who just want to experiment with block printing.

So as soon as I got my book, I created my own stamps using art foam sheets and documented the process for you!

1. Sketch your design for the stamps.

I wanted to design something pretty to print on an A2 size greeting card (4.25″ x 5.5″), so I drew the frame that’s the size of the card in my sketchbook first. Bold and simple designs work really well for block printing and definitely easier for beginners.

I really liked one of my watercolor painting of camellias, so I sketched the design based on the artwork using a pencil.

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2. Trace the design with pencil on a tracing paper.

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3. Transfer the image on to the art foam sheet surface.

Put the tracing paper down with pencil side facing the art foam sheet. (I grabbed this art foam at a craft store.) The pack of art foams I got came in variety of colors, and I just used this blue one.

On the hindsight, I probably should’ve used a lighter colored foam sheet because it was hard to see the pencil lines on the blue sheet.

These art foam sheets are handy because it’s got adhesive on the back, and it makes it really easy to mount the pieces on the board later.

To transfer the image, you rub the tracing paper from the back with a spoon or a bone folder. Be careful not to make an indent on the foam sheet because that will show up when you start printing.

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4. I MADE A MISTAKE HERE – You’re supposed to do step 5 first before cutting all the pieces out 😀

But I wasn’t following Andrea’s instructions carefully and cut all the pieces apart before adding the lines and details. It’s easier to add lines (essentially drawing on the foam sheet) when everything is on one sheet.

Anyway, do that first, and then you can cut out the pieces with scissors or an exacto knife.

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5. Add lines and details to your stamps.

So make sure you do this first before cutting all the pieces out. As you can see, it’s not the end of the world if you reverse the process, but it’s definitely easier if you do the detailing before cutting them apart.

To add indented lines, you go over your drawing on the foam sheet using a tool with a sharp tip – in this project, I used a skewer. You can also use knitting needles, dried-up ball point pen, and other tools for making an indent on a foam surface.

When printing, the indented lines will not get inked and the flat surface will get the ink. Again, be careful not to make a mark with your fingers/nails where not intended. If you do, it will show up in your prints. When accident happens, though, I try to be flexible and incorporate it into my design somehow 🙂

These foam pieces look cool just by themselves, don’t they?

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6. Mount your stamp pieces on a piece of plexiglass.

I got a piece of acrylic sheet at an art supply store and cut them down using my exacto trimmer – it sort of worked but totally shattered the edges of the plates and aren’t very pretty!!

(I later ordered this cutting tool from Hyde and hope it does a better job.)

You place the plexiglass cut to size (mine is 5.5″ w x 4.25″ h) over your design and peel the backing from the sheet and stick them on to the plate.

By mounting the pieces on to the plexiglass, it makes it easier to print the same design over and over, and you’re able to apply even pressure on to your stamps when printing.

Again, be careful not to make an indent on your foam pieces while sticking them on to the plexiglass.

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Since I wanted to print my design in two colors (one color for flowers and another for the leaves), I’m creating a separate plate for just the leaves. I didn’t quite like the layout of my original drawing, so I’m shifting some leaves around here.

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7. Two plates with the foam pieces are done!

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8. Here is the test print I made using stamp pads.

To ink the plates, I lay the stamps on the table and coat the foam sheet surface evenly using the stamp pads.

Then I pick up the mounted stamps, lay the plate down straight on to the paper and apply pressure using the palm of my hand. I marked the corners of my plate on the paper so it’s easy to match up the two plates.

I used the red ink for the flowers and navy blue for the leaves. Pretty, yes ?

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You can wash, pat dry and fine tune any of the details on the foam and print more until you’re happy with the result.

It was a pretty quick project. It probably took me about an hour or an hour and a half from start to finish? And clean-up is pretty easy as there was no paint rollers or plates to clean up!

I want to experiment and create more fun stamps to play with! 🙂 Hope you’ll give it a try!

p.s. I’m offering a foam stamp making workshop on February 4th in Seattle. If you’re curious, head on over to my website and learn more 🙂

xo Yuko

Yuko Miki Honeyberry Studios Headshot